She Speaks We Hear

Bringing women's voices together, unaltered, unadulterated


1 Comment

More needs to be done to protect the mental health of young British Muslims

In a society where Muslims are constantly placed under the lens, examined, picked apart and policed for their views, it can be argued that the chances of young Muslims developing and suffering from mental disorders is increasing. From anxiety to depression, the mental and physical health of the Muslim community is deteriorating, with there being a lack of support and recognition of this issue within our local communities and groups. But more than anything, the increase in such disorders demonstrates how the current narrative that is prominent in society is becoming increasingly problematic to the growth of young Muslims across the world.

Social media is a wonderful tool that allows us to stay connected to millions of people from all over the world, from different backgrounds and communities, thus providing us with stories, both good and bad, from all over the world. However, for all of its benefits, social media has also developed an ugly side where racism, xenophobia, sexism and bullying of all types has become prominent. With the rise of videos portraying attacks on visibly Muslim men and women circulating across platforms like Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, and with organisations like Tell Mama and CAIR reporting that ‘2017 is to be the worst year for anti – Muslim hate crime’, it is becoming harder for Muslims to ignore the rising anti – Muslim sentiment.

As a young Muslim, I constantly find myself in conversation with other Muslims who talk about their struggles with mental health and the constant pressure and dread they feel whenever terrorist incidents happen. Creating a focus group, I asked some young British Muslim students about their experiences and views when discussing the mainstram narrative in the media. As one young Muslim woman, aged 20, explains,


“The reaction of Muslims is no different to that of any individual, the first thought that rushes to our minds is that we hope that people are okay.’ As she explains, ‘Despite being Muslim, we are also British – these aren’t two mutually exclusive identities, but rather one – I am a British Muslim, and as a result I care for those living within my community.”

This idea was supported by others within the discussion, with many explaining how the backlash of the media coverage causes them to worry as it ‘gives the far-right fuel to attack us’. Many also expressed their discontent at the response of the local authorities, with one individual making reference to the acid attack in East London which saw a young Muslim woman and her cousin suffering severe burns and the felt reluctancy of the authorities to proactively seek out the perpetrator.

When asked about how they felt leaving their homes as visible Muslims, or how they felt about loved ones who did observe religious wear, many expressed their concerns. One woman, also 20, explained how it ‘felt dangerous to be brown’, with many agreeing given the current climate and rise in acid attacks they felt as though they were more likely to be victims, even if they weren’t wearing religious attire.

This has also raised the question over the racialised aspect of Islamophobia, with many pointing to individuals like Tommy Robinson for solely attacking the South Asian, but also more generally, the BME Muslim community and their failure to ‘integrate’. Many Muslim women have also expressed their concerns over travelling alone, as many feel afraid to look ‘too Muslim’ in public for fear that they may be attacked or harrassed. The men within the discussion also raised concerns that when dressed in Islamic clothing they felt ‘on edge’, but also expressed their sympathy as they believed Muslim women were more at risk of being victimised.

Many young Muslims have also taken to Twitter to criticise the ‘apologetic culture’ that has become prominent, where Muslims have to rush to defend themselves online whenever news breaks of a terrorist attack, with this happening before it is even confirmed that the perpetrator was a Muslim. Many argue that such actions not only emphasise the alleged relationship between Islam and terrorism, but that the only people who should apologise are the perpetrators, not the entire Muslim community. However, some have argued that condemnations are needed, as without these they feel they (Muslims) would be more ostracised from society.  This also shows how within this spectrum of opinions, Muslims are conscious of their image and how they come across within society.

Not only are young Muslims being exposed to the hateful discourse online, but many are starting to doubt their own faith and are taking steps to disassociate themselves from their religion in order to escape the hate they may receive. Some Muslims have explained how there is a ‘sense of anxiety surrounding the Muslim community’, with others explaining how many Muslims ‘feeling ashamed of their own religion’. This sentiment not only demonstrates the alienation they experience virtually, but also from their own local support system, as pulling away from the religion causes personal relationships to break down, thus making more Muslims prone to mental health disorders like depression and anxiety. Many individuals have explained how they have taken their hijabs off or shaved their beards in order to look less Muslim or shorten their names in order to ‘blend in’. As one individual explains,

‘We shouldn’t be excluded from society because we choose to practice our faith’.

Therefore, it becomes clear that the current discourse surrounding Muslims is proving detrimental to Muslim mental health. Stuck between constantly apologising to not apologising enough, to being Muslim or ‘not Muslim enough’, the current Muslim generation is growing up in a time where they are placed under the critical lense, leaving them in a complex paradox. Add this to the existing issues young people face whilst growing up, it can be argued that young Muslims are finding it harder to hold onto their religion and their own identity. More must be done within the Muslim community to tackle the issues surrounding mental health, anxiety and to nurture the spiritual growth of our youth. Whether that be through self help workshops or mindfulness and counselling at our local community centres or mosques, we must be more proactive in creating a generation of Muslims who are confident with their identity and can be strong minded individuals.

by Zahraa A

 

Zahraa A is currently going into her final year of my International Relations degree. She loves anything and everything political or historic, with postcolonial theory, feminism and anything surrounding political movements from the PoC/BME community, Muslims and her own South Asian culture being her key interests. She blogs at ‘The Muslim Diaspora‘.

Disclaimer: the opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the original author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the websbite
Advertisements


Leave a comment

Impact of hate crimes on mental health

14869969397_3aa527678c_b

In the UK the rates of depression and suicide are on the rise, with the last known statistic suggesting 1 in 4 adults experience a diagnosed mental health issue. The statistics suggest that 1 in 10 children and young people have a mental health problem including depression, anxiety and conduct disorder, with 70% of children and young people not having had an appropriate intervention at a sufficiently early age. This is worrying. What is more worrying is the constraints and challenges faced when attempting to access mental health services.

Having spent a decade working in the mental health field with children, young people and adults I have heard one too many narratives of how our community struggles to overcome the barriers and challenges which prevent people from accessing statutory mental health services. And for those who access services, the challenges they face are numerous.

Following the brutal austerity measures and financial crises here in the UK, as well as an increase in racist and Islamophobic hate crimes in a post Brexit society I question if we are experiencing further mental health distress. How does race intersect with the crisis people of colour experience at being disproportionately affected and diagnosed with the label of a mental health problem?

In July, several colleagues and I went to the streets of London and took part in a Black Lives Matter protest. Many of us were and still are outraged at the racial injustices towards our brothers and sisters. During the protest I felt at home with many of my black brothers and sisters and it reminded me of some of my driving forces. One of which is knowing that our mental health system has many flaws. More often than not, members of our community fall through the cracks or do not receive appropriate support. One way we have tried to tackle this issue is with the rise of grassroots community organisations.

With an awareness that our National Health Service continues to experience cuts, and staff are continually stretched I remain optimistic, although some might call me disillusioned. When we compare our mental health system with America for example, I consider the benefits of receiving therapy on the NHS. Many of my clients have often come from a lower socio-economic background which has meant that they would not be able to access therapeutic services if it was not for the NHS.

That said, people of colour face many challenges in accessing appropriate mental health support. We need a mental health system that acknowledges different knowledge systems and ontologies in order to better meet the needs of these communities. I believe that this can be achieved by inciting structural change within the systems which at times perpetuate the disparity of mental health care our cultural groups receive.

I have been fortunate to meet several psychologists and psychotherapists employed within the NHS tackling some of these concerns and encouraging a shift in white Western paradigms that are not always functional for people of colour. As well as working in the NHS, I also engage in independent work and through this avenue I am passionate for us to build safe spaces where we can have open and honest discussions about the difficulties and distress we experience as people of colour in Luton and Birmingham. If you are interested in self-care and taking care of your mental health please get in touch (author contact details below).

 

About the author

Dr Amirah Iqbal is a womanist, an advocate for equality, a counselling psychologist, a writer and an activist. She has worked with many disenfranchised groups in Birmingham, and more recently Bedfordshire, notably Black (African, Caribbean and Asian) communities. In her spare time she enjoys reading, travelling, painting (the key word being abstract), exploring, writing, meditation and prayer. She can be found on Twitter and Facebook.

Disclaimer: the opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the original author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the website.

Image credit:  Jon Grainger


1 Comment

Bravo France

Last night I forced myself to look at this image. Over and over again. It was uncomfortable, sickening and terrifying. But as I sat up in bed, in the dark, with Imaan asleep next to me, I forced myself to stare at it.

I had scrolled past the image earlier in the day. I was afraid to read what accomponied the picture. I wanted to be in denial. Wanted to shroud myself in ignorance. Because if you don’t know, you don’t feel.

But this is reality. Reality for Muslim women across the globe. Women who bear the brunt and consequences of war, terrorism, Islamaphobia.

Muslim women who are thought to be so oppressed that they cannot exercise their own freedom of choice. Even if a woman is screaming THIS IS MY CHOICE, the world responds ‘you are so oppressed you think this is what you want…let us liberate you’

Let us liberate you with our guns on a crowded beach. Let us enforce this rule upon you. Make you strip in front of the world. In front of your crying, terrified children. All because you choose to cover up.
We do not understand why you do it, nor do we approve.

So remove your clothing.

Stripped of humanity
Stripped of compassion
Stripped of dignity
Isolated. Degraded. Humiliated.

Bravo France. The very women you want to integrate into your society are the ones you are now criminalising and marginalising.

Bravo. Bravo

by Sabbiyah Pervez

Sabbiyah Pervez, is a journalist and an advocate for social change, you can read more about her work at http://sabbiyah.co.uk and follow her on Twitter @sabbiyah 

Disclaimer: the opinions expressed in this article are solely those of the original author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the website.

There Is No Such Thing As Islamophobia

Leave a comment

Watch Manchester based poet and spoken word artist, Hafsah Aneela Bashir perform a powerful spoken word piece. In this strong and heartfelt performance, she directly challenges the notion that Islamophobia is not real, whilst simultaneously highlighting negative media portrayal of Muslims.

There Is No Such Thing As Islamophobia – FULL TEXT:

You should have seen how I took her down

Pulled that towel right off her head in town

She was screaming as I spat in her face

These rag heads  taking over all our space

I’ll teach her to go back to where she comes from….

 

There is no such thing as Islamaphobia

 

Settle down settle down boys, bell went ages ago!

Now in light of recent events, let’s discuss Charlie Hebdo

I think Prophet Mohammed T-shirts should be worn to challenge offended muslims everywhere

And every other school kid turns to the one muslim boy and stares

The same stare he gives back

When slapped

by older schoolboys, who tell him

he’s a paki terrorist

There is no such thing as Islamophobia

It’s hot on this damn tube

In my smart shoes and business suit

And I’m seeing this hummus-eating camel-shagging, Paki muslim slut

And I turn to Greg next to me and say I don’t give a fuck

My freedom of speech gives me the choice,

So I sing at the top of my voice

Kill them, kill them all….

 

There is no such thing as Islamophobia

 

The sun bears down on an Essex park

Lighting up crisp blades of grass

A breeze moves gently through flowers of red

Where a woman in a burkha and scarf lays dead

Sixteen stab wounds decorated her  body they said…..

 

There is no such thing as Islamophobia

 

I didn’t need to run up fast

That old Muzzrat just shuffled past

Three quick stab wounds to his back

Went down instantly in the attack

Planted bombs at his nearby masjid

Tipton, Walsall, you get my drift

‘Self starter’ racist I am, not a terrorist!

 

There is no such thing as Islamophobia

 

There are two exits to Grimsby mosque

But we had each one boxed off

A petrol bomb for each one

And one for the roof, job done

For queen and country, we served well

Ex soldiers if you couldn’t tell

We’re patriotic us, not extreme

Wer just trying to keep Britain clean

 

There is no such thing as Islamophobia

 

Status – Obviously when I got on the plane I checked no one looked like a terrorist

Status – Mate I changed tube cos a bearded man sat there reading arabic scripture muttering under his breath

Status – Dunno what the hell they carrying under their veils – I ain’t getting killed for political correctness

Status- Why do your people  hate our West so much that you wana destroy it? Piss off back to where you came from

Status- For every person beheaded by these sick savages we should drag 10 off the streets and behead them, film it and put it online. For every child they cut in half … we cut one of their children in half. An eye for an eye..

 

There is no such thing as Islamophobia

 

Daily Mail – Muslims tell us how to run our schools

The Independent – Fundamentalists plotting to bring jihad into the classrooms

Daily Star – Muslim sickos- Maddie kidnap shock

Daily Express – Hogwash,  Now the PC brigade bans piggy banks in case they offend Muslims

The Sun – Muslim Convert beheads woman

Evening Standard – Muslim plot to behead soldier in UK

Brit kids forced to eat halal school dinners

Al Qaeda Corrie threat

Jihadist plot to take over city schools

Ramadaan a ding dong

Halal secret of pizza express

Muslim thugs are just 12 in knife attack on Brit school boy

Muslims loonies hijack elections

Muslim only loos

Muslims

Muslims

Muslims

There is no such thing as Islamophobia

Hafsah Aneela Bashir is a poet, writer and spoken word artist who has just completed an MA in Postcolonial Literary and Culture at the University of Leeds. Her work with NGO’s, providing emergency supplies and medical aid to conflict zones informs her creativity producing a form of lyrical activism. Her poetry has been published by Crocus Books in the anthology, ‘When Saira Met Sara’ bringing together Muslim and Jewish writers. She writes to raise awareness about social injustice and has a keen interest in writing as a form of resistance and liberty. She has worked with Women Asylum Seekers Together to use creative agency as a means to highlight demands for basic human rights. Also part of writing collectives called Common Word and Manchester Muslim Writers, she facilitates poetry workshops within the community working with young people to develop an understanding of identity and empowerment. She has performed for Oxfam, RAPAR, Freedom From Torture,  Justice Festival 2016, at many interfaith events and at various academic conferences. She can often be found at open-mics in and around Manchester in her spare time. Her latest project involves scriptwriting short plays with Women In The Spotlight and Three Minute Theatre. She was recently invited to create and perform her poetry at Manchester Cathedral to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica genocide. Her new project ‘Platform For Palestinian Arts’ will be exploring plays and poetry from the Palestinian diaspora. She blogs at http://hafsahaneelabashir.wordpress.com/

Disclaimer: the opinions expressed in this article and video clip are solely those of the original author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the website. Copyright of the content of this video and article remains with the author, however any reproduction of either the video or article should credit She Speaks We Hear.